Indoor And Outdoor Floor Levels Were To Be Similar – Courtyard Garden Design

This rear courtyard, attached to a renovated three storey terrace house, was designed by Raoul van de Laak of Good Manors Pools + Gardens.

The brief was to open up the kitchen and connect it with the garden, in the process bringing as much natural light as possible into the house. Indoor and outdoor floor levels were to be identical, there needed to be an outdoor living area that should be used in summer and winter, and there had to be privacy from a nearby apartment building and neighbouring houses.

I’m sure that the modern classic design relies on a limited palette of materials. So flooring is of ‘nomaintenance’ polished concrete, the deck and timber benches are of almost white beech, and the streamlined pergolas and bifold doors are of steel and glass. So pergola off the kitchen creates a ‘atriumstyle’ gallery at the side of the house. Large painting hangs on the wall, to punctuate this space. Did you know that the pergola in the rear garden sits above the lounge area and dining table and has an automatic sunshade to block out the northwest sun.

Covered in comfy cushions, the whitish beech lounge is top spot in the garden for weekend relaxation.

It is complemented by the white beech rollable spa cover, that doubles as a day bed. So a vertical sandstone flagging feature wall stretches behind both spaces, in order to connect spa and lounge areas. I know that the sandstone was laid at different depths to create an unique wall that provides visual interest and textural variation. Did you know that the plants, a mix of the tropical and the architectural, include a large clump of giant bird of paradise and a large planting of Bangalow palms, underplanted with Golden Cane palms and philodendron, to pry eyes at bay. Along the other side of the courtyard is a row of grey bamboo and a flourishing expanse of star jasmine on top of the wall, for privacy.

Covered in comfy cushions, the almost white beech lounge is top-notch spot in the garden for weekend relaxation. Surely it’s complemented by the white beech rollable spa cover, that doubles as a day bed. Vertical sandstone flagging feature wall stretches behind both spaces, with intention to connect spa and lounge areas. Sandstone was laid at different depths to create an unique wall that provides visual interest and textural variation. I am sure that the brief was to open up the kitchen and connect it with the garden, in the process bringing as much natural light as possible into the house. Indoor and outdoor floor levels were to be quite similar, there needed to be an outdoor living area that will be used in summer and winter, and there had to be privacy from a nearby apartment building and neighbouring houses.

This rear courtyard, attached to a renovated threestorey terrace house, was designed by Raoul van de Laak of Good Manors Pools + Gardens.

The pergola off the kitchen creates an atriumstyle gallery at the side of the house. Now, a large painting hangs on the wall, with intention to punctuate this space. Fact, the pergola in the rear garden sits above the lounge area and dining table and has an automatic sunshade to block out the northwest sun.

Courtyard gardens are romantically intriguing.

From outside their walls we can smell the flowers, hear the birdsong and see glimpses of fresh greenery -trees poking their heads above the walls and climbing plants spilling over them. These private sanctums provide small oases in the urban environment, where space is at a premium, and provide valuable space in which their owners can unwind. Consequently attractive are they, architects often incorporate courtyard gardens into newbuild homes where they are carefully positioned to draw in light and allow glimpses of greenery from internal windows; even major office buildings can have planted atriums at their hearts, they are not simply the preserve of the city dweller. Here’s our guide to creating this space in your personal backyard.

As an example, the verdant courtyard is the heart of the home and light, tranquillity and space enhance the rooms that surround it. Traditionally a courtyard is at ground level, fairly simple in design and contains some sort of water feature. Surely for the most part there’re no hard and fast rules when creating your space -your design will depend on the style of building you have and the courtyard’s intended use. You might choose a cool palette of simple planting, a small seating area and a water feature, I’d say in case you need it to be a soothing place to unwind. Warmer ochre tones, substantial seating areas and an open fireplace if you’re planning to do a lot of outdoor entertaining.

You might choose to enclose the courtyard with hedging or trellis woven with climbing plants.

This will allow the breeze to enter the garden and, in blustery places, filters strong winds and thus prevents the turbulence that can result from wind flowing over solid boundaries. Keep the design simple, especially if you have a small area to work with. Place one large ornament or a bunch of trees in the centre, or follow Moorish tradition and focus the design on a water feature, just like a rill or a fountain.

most courtyards are small so subtle lighting is a must -dot lanterns about and use uplighters on the walls.

Use metal halide light on whitish walls, high pressure sodium and halogen lights complement dark red or dark yellow tones. They decided to create a courtyard garden for entertaining, solar lights will probably not be suitable for a Landscape and garden designer Declan Buckley created this stylish suntrap in Broadstairs. In Owner Dan Cooper is a keen gardener and his partner. Loves to cook. Of course, most courtyards are small so subtle lighting is a must -dot lanterns about and use uplighters on the walls. Use metal halide light on almost white walls, high pressure sodium and halogen lights complement light red or yellowish tones. They decided to create a courtyard garden for entertaining, solar lights will probably not be suitable for a Landscape and garden designer Declan Buckley created this stylish suntrap in Broadstairs. In Owner Dan Cooper is a keen gardener and his partner. Loves to cook.

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